Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice

erz_glasgow_hospice

Erz

 Erz is the landscape architect for the new home of The Prince & Princess of Wales Hospice and has been working on the project since 2012. It is an award-winning Glasgow-based landscape architecture, urban design and master planning practice.The erz team is passionate about people and place. Since erz was established in 2007 the practice’s work has been recognised as thoughtful, transformative and beautiful.

 

The design and delivery of the project is being led for erz by director Rolf Roscher, working with associate Tom Witham, David Hammett and with support from the wider erz team.

The designed landscape at the new hospice will provide a strong setting to the new building, and stitch it into the wider Bellahouston Park landscape.

The external spaces will offer a valuable resource for the hospice, with the goal of improving people's quality of life and sense of wellbeing. The external spaces will provide opportunities for therapeutic activity and quiet contemplation. The landscape design was informed through consultation and close working with hospice staff.

The design carefully manages the arrival and entry sequence, embedding the site parking within a strong planted structure and creating a human scale approach to the building.

The lower portion of the site is designed to be fully accessible and incorporates a series of unique therapeutic spaces. A series of seasonal gardens are created as destinations within the landscape. The seasonal gardens will ensure that whatever time of year a person is at the hospice, there will always be a place to go that is beautiful.

The gardens are organised around an axial path that enables one to stroll through the sequence of gardens and arrive at the pond area at the lowest point on the site. The axial path also incorporates a “rill”, a small water channel that runs through the seasonal gardens to the pond. The rill brings the sound of moving water into the spaces.

There are also spaces more closely associated with the building. Private gardens are provided directly outside the patient bedrooms on the lower ground floor and the building is punctuated by shared courtyard spaces. The design incorporates a wide variety of spaces suited to the diverse needs of different patients and visitors.